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Prolemuris

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This chattering, unaggressive tree dweller prefers the relative safety of the canopy to the dangers of the rainforest floor.


The prolemuris has lateral membranes that grow out of its sides and between its lower arm and thigh. When it leaps from tree to tree, the wind catches in the flaps and slows the animal's rate of fall. This allows the animal to fall for over twelve meters without risk of injury. They have carbon-fiber bones, and the density of their musculature and flesh is also porous, which makes them much lighter than they appear (even the largest weigh only six kilograms). (Read more)
The prolemuris can use its four arms to move through the trees faster than an average man can run. It has near-perfect balance and its superb depth perception allows it to leap from branch to branch while selecting just the right handhold out of the forest mosaic.


Its ears are long, drooping flaps that can move independently of one another in order to track sounds in a precise stereo field. Its toes are webbed and have a vestigial thumb nub that helps the animal cling to branches. It has two arms that bifurcate into four forearms; the upper bones of the arms have fused, enabling mobility as they navigate through the trees. (Xenoiologists believe that this may be an evolutionary precursor to the four-limbed Na'vi). One digit is a four-jointed finger topped with a human-like fingernail; the other is a two-jointed thumb that is adapted for clasping tree limbs and vines.

They dwell in the trees in large tribal groups, and although there are some violent intertribal contests to establish hierarchy, there is little battle between tribes. They are highly social, although they do not care for their young as avidly or carefully as Terran chimpanzees. Still, the prolemuris is a diligent and effective breeder, with the female coming into mating season three times a year.


Their mating habits are similar to some species of Terran apes, including the now-extinct gorilla, Hamadryas baboon and the howler monkey (along with several human cultures as well). An alpha male prolemuris will mate with several females concurrently and assist with the child rearing for each offspring. But this polygynous arrangement is by no means an indication of male dominance. Indeed, it is believed that prolemuris social structure is largely matriarchal, with the female clearly in charge of the mate selection process.

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